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Paul Hair is a national security expert and an author. He writes under his own name and as a ghostwriter. Connect with him at http://www.liberateliberty.com/. Contact him at paul@liberateliberty.com.

Monday, April 16, 2018

Media Downplayed Chinese Espionage & Pro-Clinton Election Interference in 1990s

Chinese President Xi Jinping.
Photo by PO1 Dominique A. Pineiro.
China engages in massive espionage against the U.S. and has done so for decades. On top of this, the media have known of it for nearly as long. But they downplayed explosive reports on it in the 1990s because they reflected negatively on then President Bill Clinton, and because they showed how the Chinese interfered in the 1996 presidential election in favor of Clinton. This stands in blunt contrast to the hysteria the media have ginned up over Russian conspiracy theories today.

China is the top, long-term national security threat to the United States of America. And it’s been so for many years. One of the reasons it threatens the U.S. is because it successfully engages in wide-ranging espionage against America. Nearly every week brings new stories of Chinese spying operations against the U.S.

But the media have always downplayed this threat, particularly so during the 1990s.

In 1999, the U.S. House of Representatives published a report called the “U.S. National Security and Military/Commercial Concerns with the People’s Republic of China.” Then U.S. Rep. Christopher Cox chaired the report and it subsequently became known as the Cox Report. It is a monstrous, three-volume tome containing nearly 1,000 pages, and it documents how the Chinese stole U.S. weapons systems information, including “design information on the United States’ most advanced thermonuclear weapons.”

Even worse, the Cox Report concluded that, “The PRC has proliferated weapons systems and components to other countries including Iran, Pakistan, Libya, Syria, and North Korea” (page xiii, Adobe page 28). . . .

Read the entire article at The Loftus Party.

Note: The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement.

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